Historic Triangle Trip!

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This February I chaperoned a trip to the Historic Triangle in Virginia with two other teachers. The three of us enjoyed the company of nine students from our high school, Desert Christian, in Tucson, AZ. This trip was orchestrated by one of our seniors for her capstone project. All seniors must complete a capstone project that either gives back to the community or is beneficial to the school or its students before they can graduate.

For this capstone project, the goal was simple: take Desert students on a field trip of a lifetime where they will learn about our nation’s origins while also discovering God’s providence and engaging in meaningful fellowship. The Historic Triangle includes Jamestown, where the English first established a permanent settlement and thus, the first capital of Virginia, Colonial Williamsburg, the second capital of Virginia and first major “city,” and Yorktown, the last major engagement of the Revolutionary War and where the British surrendered to the Patriots. Here is a larger map to include the current capital of Virginia, Richmond.

The 12 of us spent seven days exploring these three historic areas, even throwing in a quick jaunt around William and Mary College. We spent our nights at an Air B&B, ate family style meals around a great table, shared life stories and participated in many shenanigans.

This is a trip none of us will ever forget. We learned, we laughed, we played, we sang, we explored and we shared of ourselves. I am grateful to have been asked to come along on this journey with some of the most amazing people! Below is a 6-minute video of our trip.

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2018 Titan II Missile Museum Field Trip!

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Last week my US History students went on a field trip to the Titan II Missile Museum. Located just 45 minutes from our school, visitors can experience for themselves the last remaining nuclear missile silo from the Cold War era. “This preserved Titan II missile site, officially known as complex 571-7, is all that remains of the 54 Titan II missile sites that were on alert across the United States from 1963 to 1987” (Titan Missile Museum). Below are some of the class comments about their time during the field trip and a few of the pictures students took. The parent chaperones had a great time too! Here is a link to a gallery of photos that a parent took.

…it gives amazing insight into what the government and military was doing during the Cold War and definitely makes you realize just how serious of a situation it was… – Drew

Possibly one of the most exciting sites to see in the city of Tucson, Arizona, the Titan II Missile Museum mesmerizes (sic) its visitors with technology found in no other museum. – Tori

The 390th Strategic Missile Wing helped to keep the peace during the Cold War for 24 years, with its main message being “peace through deterrence,” which obviously worked. – Tori

Not only did I learn extremely interesting information about the Cold War and how missiles work, but my eyes were opened to how serious the situation really could have been.  If anyone is looking for an opportunity to learn about Tucson’s own contribution to the world’s affairs, and wants an interactive, walk-through experience, this museum is a fantastic option. – Tori

Not only is the museum tour entirely educational, the wonders of Cold War era technology and protocols are only fathomable (sic) once seen. – Wini

Not only will you learn about the history of the cold war and Titan missiles but you will also beforehand learn the chemistry of why and how the missile is able to launch. – Kati

I would give Titan 2 Missile Museum 10 big red buttons out of 10. – Emma

Perhaps the most entertaining thing I learned was what life was like for the soldiers themselves stationed at the missile silo.  While their lives must’ve seemed uneventful, they carried a duty to essentially carry out WWIII if necessary. This surely was a huge responsibility to bear. – Adam

This place also serve as a reminder of our human nature, each of us is always trying to be on top of the game. The idea of Mutually Assured Destruction resonates through the silo and the missile stands a pillar of strength to back those thoughts. – Sky

A demonstration was done to show how the chemicals self ignite. Another demonstration was done to show how the missile takes off and what the flame would look like. – Taylor

One thing that interested me the most was “peace through deterrence.” The fact that this was the only thing keeping the Cold War from going hot is unbelievable. – Taylor

As an aspiring Airman it just gave me another reason why I want to enter that field. To honor those who came before me and to inspire those who follow me. – Taylor

I left with the knowledge of what the lifestyle was like for the crew and the amount of precautions that they had to take to ensure security. – Aubrie

I had the opportunity to stand facing an object that held the potential to alter the course of our nation’s history within minutes and that could have destroyed numerous lives and generations to come. – Aubrie

The tour guide keeps visitors engaged by involving the audience, by letting someone sit in the chair and press buttons, and by asking questions. – Chelsea

There are no words to explain how amazing it felt to be so close to it all, to be able to see the actual bomb, to be able to see the motherboard which controlled everything in the shelter. – Carlos

…Chuck did several demonstrations though one that produced the loudest, “Whoaaa” was when Chuck filled a water jug with a small amount of rocket fuel, and setting the jug into a plastic, skeletal-like cylinder, he held a flame to the open nozzle, exposing the fumes to the rocket fuel and BAM off it went. – Hannah

Being able to understand the chemical reactions behind it all showed me how there was so much more than pushing a button and ta-da, big explosion, but there was time, study and hours of lab work dedicated to the construction of this missile. – Hannah